The permit requirements for Long-Term Stormwater Management in New Development and Redevelopment for Stormwater Minimum Control Measure 5 (MCM 5) are defined in Section 4.2.5-4.2.8.7.2 of the Jordan Valley Municipalities (MS4) Permit; No. UTS000001
MCM Regulation and Summary
1.5, 1.6.5.1, 2.2, 2.2.5, 4.1, 4.5, 4.1.2.2, 4.1.3.2
Show permit accountability, provide a description of program elements, minimum SWMP programs annual review, identifying inefficiencies, making necessary changes, and reporting overall program performance. 


Programs
5.1 Stormwater Ordinance (Land Development)
5.2 Riverton City Standards Specifications and Plans
5.3 Long-Term Stormwater Management Plan and Agreement
5.4 Stormwater Easement
5.5 Storm Drain Fee


5.1: Stormwater Ordinances (Land Development)
Year Executed: 2010
Program Regulation and Summary:
4.2.5.1, 4.2.5.2, 4.2.5.2.1, 4.2.5.2.2, 4.2.5.2.3
Through an ordinance, or other regulatory mechanism, require long term stormwater controls and enforcement for new development/redevelopment.
Target Pollutants:
Trash, debris, nutrients, pesticides & herbicides, bacteria & viruses, automotive petrochemicals, detergents, cleaning agents and sediment.    Other pollutants common with commercial, private communities, institutions and public infrastructure.
Audience:
Developers, Engineers, Architects, Planners and City Staff
Description:
The ordinances listed below are current and were adopted to facilitate the MS4 regulations for all 6 MCM’s.
Primary ordinances passed to satisfy MS4 regulation include:
13.20 Riverton City Stormwater Ordinance 
13.25 Riverton City Stormwater Utility Ordinance 
The following ordinances also support MS4 regulation but were passed independent of MS4 regulation include:
15 Buildings and Construction
17 Subdivision
18 Land Use and Development
18.115 Geologic Hazards
18.115 Groundwater Protection Overlay Zone
Measure of Success:
Annually identify failures related to insufficient or absent development ordinance.   
Responsible Staff:
Public Works Director, City Engineer, Planning Director, Flood Control Engineer
Funding:
Storm Drain Fee, General Fund
Appendix:
Conclusions
2021-2022
No problems identified with development related ordinance regarding water quality.  There were DEQ suggested changes in 2014 but programs are not affected by this ordinance deficiency.

 

5.2: Riverton City Standards Specifications and Plans
Year Executed: 2011
Program Regulation and Summary:
4.2.1.3, 4.2.1.4, 4.2.4.3.1, 4.2.4.3.3, 4.2.5.1, 4.2.5.1.1, 4.2.5.1.2, 4.2.5.1.3,4.2.5.2.4, 4.2.5.3, 4.2.3.1 4.2.5.3.2, 4.2.5.5
Provide development design requirements for property owners design and maintenance agents, including and not limited to requirements for, flood and water quality control, retention regulation, encouraging LID options (5 options minimum), maintenance and operations requirements, agreements governing maintenance-inspection documentation.
Target Pollutants:
Trash, debris, nutrients, pesticides & herbicides, bacteria & viruses, automotive petrochemicals, detergents, cleaning agents and sediment. Other pollutants common with commercial, private communities, institutions and public infrastructure.
Audience:
Developers, Engineers, Architects and City Staff
Description:
The Standards Specifications and Plans Manual references UTS00001 and includes development design specifications for appurtenant MCM 5 requirements and SWMP Programs.  
Also, SWMP program templates, forms and supporting instruction for MCM 4 and 5 program's not practical for the Standard Manual document are provided by the City webpage referenced below. 
The Standards Specifications and Plans Manual includes UPDES design standards for, including but not limited to:
1. Flood and water quality system specifications and details.
2. Educational water quality design instruction for developers, engineers and architects. 
3. Long-Term Stormwater Management 
4. Retention regulation 
5. Low Impact Development encouragement 
6. Water quality systems and long-term stormwater management systems review process checks.
Measure of Success:
Annually evaluate the effectiveness of UPDES programs and City Developoment Standards.  Make conclusions and recommendations to City.
Responsible Staff:
Public Works Director, City Engineer, Planning Director, Flood Control Engineer
Funding:
Storm Drain Fee, General Fund
Program Documents:
UPDES Design Standards
2021-2022
City standards are currently under review.  Throughout, the majority of the report period City development review staff was not in consensus for managing the regulation retention requirement, low impact development (LID) and long-term stormwater management for private and public infrastructure.  Consequently, one property subject to regulation retention did not conform to the retention standard. 
A process for documenting and encouraging LID options for managing retention regulation is not functional.  Private development is allowed to consider all LID selections provided by the State "A Guide to Low Impact Development within Utah" but not public infrastructure.  There are 5 LID options for managing retention are in draft but they are not adopted. 

Long-term Stormwater Management Plan Program review was separated from flood control requirements of development review.  For best success, long-term stormwater management water quality control systems should be reviewed with developments flood control systems at the development design stage.  


5.3: Long-Term Stormwater Management Plan and Agreement
Year Executed: 2011
Program Regulation and Summary:
4.2.1.3, 4.2.1.4, 4.2.4.3.1, 4.2.5.1, 4.2.5.2.2, 4.2.5.2.3, 4.2.5.2.4, 4.2.5.2.5, 4.2.5.3, 4.2.5.3.1, 4.2.5.3.2 4.2.5.4, 4.2.5.4.1, 4.2.5.4.2
Provide long-term stormwater system design, maintenance instruction and education for property owners and design and maintenance agents.  Development design and maintenance requirements for property owners and agents, including and not limited to requirements for, retention regulation, encouraging LID infrastructure, maintenance and operations plans, maintenance agreements, inspection and maintenance documentation, and enforcement mechanisms.  
Target Pollutants:
Trash, debris, nutrients, pesticides & herbicides, bacteria & viruses, automotive petrochemicals, detergents, cleaning agents and sediment. Other pollutants common with commercial, industrial, private communities, institutions and public infrastructure.
Audience:
Developers, Engineers, Architects, Planners and City Staff
Description:
The program consists of implementing the Utah Stormwater Advisory Committees Long-Term Stormwater Management Plan Template and an Agreement (USWAC LTSWMP).  The USWAC LTSWMP is amended for Riverton City's local development standards and landscape hydrologic conditions.  The "Agreement" establishes the developments responsibility to UPDES Long-Term Stormwater Management Regulations and the Plan describes the flood and water quality system and maintenance requirements including, system limitations, system performance details, and means for inspection and maintenance documentation.  Program necessitates cooperation with Planning and Economic Development and Engineering Department because water quality infrastructure is designed with the flood control system during the development process. In addition, to UPDES requirements, the LTSWMP program aids with managing and enforcing the preservation of long-term flood control systems.
Measure of Success:
Annually evaluate Long-Term Stormwater Management Plan implementation and inspection reports and conclude or summarize effectiveness.
Responsible Staff:
City Engineer, Flood Control Engineer
Funding:
Storm Drain Fee, General Fund
Program Documents:
Appendix:
Conclusion:
2021-2022
The City successfully obtains detailed Long-Term Stormwater Management Plans and Agreements from all development.  The program is working and does not need to be changed however owner maintenance obligation oversight is inadequate.  A fulltime employee dedicated to program oversight is necessary for adequate implementation of the entire program.  Many cities across the State are recognizing this UPDES requirement necessitates dedicating a fulltime employee.  UPDES staff anticipates a Long-Term Stormwater Management inspector could also assist the Land Disturbance Program inspector's inspection short fall with Program 4.2 Land Disturbance permit.  



5.4: Stormwater Easement
Year Executed: 2003
Program Regulation and Summary:
4.2.5.2, 4.2.5.2.1, 4.2.5.2.3, 4.2.5.4, 4.2.5.4.1, 4.2.5.4.2
Provide legal means for flood and water quality control system access, inspection, maintenance, preservation and enforcement. 
Target Pollutants:
Trash, debris, nutrients, pesticides & herbicides, bacteria & viruses, automotive petrochemicals, detergents, cleaning agents and sediment. Other pollutants common with small private communities.
Audience:
Developers, Engineers, Architects, Planners and City Staff
Description:
Program is implemented through a traditional standard easement template document.  The stormwater easement facilitates a description, legal access, preservation, maintenance and restoration of flood and water quality control systems.  The easement is necessary when public systems drain to private property.  The Stormwater Easement and Long-Term Stormwater Management Programs are complimentary to each other.   
Measure of Success:
Successful long-term preservation of flood and water quality control systems are the measure of success.  
Responsible Staff:
City Engineer, Flood Control Engineer
Funding:
Storm Drain Fee, General Fund
Program Documents:
Conclusion:
2021-2022
No problems occurred warranting an update to this program.  This program continues as a valuable tool for managing flood and water quality control infrastructure.   It assist the Long-Term Stormwater Management Agreement for providing legal means for enforcing, protecting, preserving and maintaining permanent flood and water quality infrastructure. 


 5.5: Storm Drain Fee
Year Executed: 2011
Program Regulation and Summary:
4.1.2.2
Secure the necessary resources to meet all the requirements of the permit.
Audience:
Commercial, industrial, institutional, single family home residents, and staff
Description:
The Storm Drain Fee is a user fee accounts for a properties long-term use of public infrastructure and environmental pollution impact.  The long-term impact calculations are a function of a properties impervious surface area, roadway use, and the unique pollution impact.   In other words, each property's fee calculates the rate of runoff discharged to publicly maintained roadways system, the daily traffic to and from the property and the pollution risk reaching public drainage infrastructure and State and City regulated surface and subsurface water resources.   The fee is intended to fund the cost of all City SWMP Programs necessary to comply with the UPDES 6 Minimum Control Measures.  
Measure of Success:
The program is successful when the Storm Drain Fee adequately funds necessary SWMP programs. 
Responsible Staff:
Public Works Director, Flood Control Engineer
Funding:
Storm Drain Fee, General Fund
Conclusion:
2021-2022
As mentioned, the City should dedicate an FTE to the Long-Term Stormwater Mangement Program.  This FTE deficiency may not be the result of fund short falls but probably more a function of understanding the necessity for a Long-Term Stormwater Management Program FTE to fully comply with MCM5.  Every year more municipalities are recognizing the need for a dedicated FTE for Long-Term Stormwater Management much like a dedicated construction inspector has been accepted. 
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