The permit requirements for Long-Term Stormwater Management in New Development and Redevelopment for Stormwater Minimum Control Measure 5 (MCM 5) are defined in Section 4.2.5-4.2.8.7.2 of the Jordan Valley Municipalities (MS4) Permit; No. UTS000001
The following is a summary of the requirements for MCM 5.
  1. Through an ordinance, or other regulatory mechanism, require long term stormwater controls on new development and redevelopment.
  2. Develop an enforcement strategy and implement enforcement procedures to obtain compliance for chronic and recalcitrant violators
  3. Develop a plan to retrofit existing developed public and private sites that are adversely impacting water quality.
  4. Develop design standards including LID that will minimize adverse stormwater affects of developed property.  Make this information available contractors, engineers, architects and planners.

Programs
5.1 Stormwater Ordinance (Land Development)
5.2 Riverton City Standards Specifications and Plans
5.3 Long-Term Stormwater Management Plan and Agreement
5.4 Stormwater Easement
5.5 Public Infrastructure Retrofit Plan
5.6 Private Property Retrofit Plan
5.7 New Development LID Incentive
5.8 Existing Development LID Incentive
5.9 Stormwater Utility Fee Abatement



5.1: Stormwater Ordinances (Land Development)
Year Executed: 2010
Reference Regulation:
4.2.5.1, 4.2.5.2, 4.2.5.2.1, 4.2.5.2.2, 4.2.5.2.3
Target Pollutants:
Trash, debris, nutrients, pesticides & herbicides, bacteria & viruses, automotive petrochemicals, detergents, cleaning agents and sediment.    Other pollutants common with commercial, private communities, institutions and public infrastructure.
Audience:
Developers, Engineers, Architects, Planners and City Staff
Description:
The ordinances listed below are current and were adopted to facilitate the MS4 regulations for all 6 MCM’s.
Primary ordinances passed to satisfy MS4 regulation include:
13.20 Riverton City Stormwater Ordinance 
13.25 Riverton City Stormwater Utility Ordinance 
The following ordinances also support MS4 regulation but were passed independent of MS4 regulation include:
15 Buildings and Construction
17 Subdivision
18 Land Use and Development
18.115 Geologic Hazards
18.115 Groundwater Protection Overlay Zone
Measure of Success:
Count the number of development applications where requirements were waived that were directly a result of insufficient or absent development ordinance.   Make conclusions and recommendations to City Council.
5.1 Performance Information
Responsible Staff:
Stormwater Manager
Involved staff: Public Works Director, City Engineer, Engineering(Development), Planning Director
Funding:
Stormwater Utility, General Fund
Appendix:
SWMP Amendment (included ordinance amendments)
5.1 Conclusions
2020-2021
Ordinance was not changed and is currently sufficient for supporting the programs.  

 


 5.2: Riverton City Standards Specifications and Plans
Year Executed: 2011
Reference Regulation:
4.2.4.3.3, 4.2.5.2, 4.2.5.2.1, 4.2.5.2.2, 4.2.5.3.2, 4.2.5.3.4, 4.2.5.4, 4.2.5.4.1, 4.2.5.4.2, 4.2.5.4.3, 4.2.5.5.2
Target Pollutants:
Trash, debris, nutrients, pesticides & herbicides, bacteria & viruses, automotive petrochemicals, detergents, cleaning agents and sediment. Other pollutants common with commercial, private communities, institutions and public infrastructure.
Audience:
Developers, Engineers, Architects, Planners and City Staff
Description:
The Standards Specifications and Plans manual provides development design specifications for all infrastructure requirements to govern the health welfare and well being of citizens including support for MS4 regulations for all 6 MCM’s.  
This program included master plans which also regulate and support MS4 requirements.
This program includes Low Impact Development requirements that were not practical to in include with Standards Specifications and Plans Manual. directly but included by reference here and the quick link for Low Impact Development Design Standards.
Rational:
Standards Specifications and Plans specific to MS4 regulation is essential to facilitating the 6 MCMs. 
Measure of Success:
Annually evaluate the program issues related to design standards.  Make conclusions and recommendations to City.
Responsible Staff:
Stormwater, Utility Manager, Salt Lake County Public Works Department, Engineering Division
Funding:
Stormwater Utility
Standard Operations Procedures:
none
Program Documents:
Stormwater Design Standards
2014-2018
No design standard issues were documented



5.3: Long-Term Stormwater Management Plan and Agreement
Year Executed: 2011
Reference Regulation:
4.2.1.3, 4.2.1.4, 4.2.4.3.1, 4.2.5.1, 4.2.5.2.2, 4.2.5.2.3, 4.2.5.2.4, 4.2.5.2.5, 4.2.5.3, 4.2.5.3.1, 4.2.5.3.2 4.2.5.4, 4.2.5.4.1, 4.2.5.4.2
Target Pollutants:
Trash, debris, nutrients, pesticides & herbicides, bacteria & viruses, automotive petrochemicals, detergents, cleaning agents and sediment. Other pollutants common with commercial, private communities, institutions and public infrastructure.
Audience:
Developers, Engineers, Architects, Planners and City Staff
Description:
New development and redevelopment is required to create a Long-Term Stormwater Management Plan.  The program consist of Long-Term Stormwater Management Plan Template and an Agreement form.  The Agreement defines the developments legal responsibility to the City and MS4 regulations and the Plan explains the stormwater infrastructure, its limitations and the necessary maintenance to preserve flood control and protect the quality of stormwater runoff.
The Long-Term Stormwater Management Plan purpose:
1. Inform the Owner including, personnel, subcontractors, consultants, agents and maintenance subcontractors of the long-term stormwater management purpose and regulations.
2. Describe the site infrastructure and its abilities and limitations at controlling and containing pollutants.
3. Describe the developments unique maintenance requirements necessary maintain adequate flood control and water quality control.
4. Provide standard operation procedures to compensate for limitations of the site infrastructure and its operations.
5. Facilitate Owner reporting.
6 Facilitate Owner accountability.
The program also satisfies 4.2.1.3, 4.2.1.4 as per the rational below.
Rational:
The intention is to ensure new development and redevelopment control and contain their impact generated by their site’s operations and maintenance.  The approach is to encourage the owner to design LID into the site infrastructure to minimize or contain pollutants in order to reduce the level of standard operation procedures necessary to compensate for the LID limitations.  For example, if the site retains all runoff or the structural water quality device is designed to filter the pollutants it generates then the SOP's can less controls.  However, when the site infrastructure will not contain the pollutants then the SOP must include controls to compensate.  This encourages the Owner to design LID and effective permanent water quality devices in order to reduce the maintenance requirements.  However, ultimately the owner is expected to demonstrate through inspection reports that the sites Long-Term Stormwater Management Plan is effective at controlling the pollutants.
Measure of Success:
Evaluate Long-Term Stormwater Management Plan implementation and inspection reports and annually conclude or  summarize progress and effectiveness.
Responsible Staff:
Stormwater Manager
Funding:
Stormwater Utility
Program Documents:
Conclusion:
2018-2019
The City has required and successfully obtained robust Long-Term Stormwater Management plans and agreements for the majority of projects since 2011.  Only less than a hand full of protects of political nature have not completed the Long-Term Stormwater Management Plan and Agreements however, staff intends to ultimately obtain them as allowed with program follow up.    Program for implementation is working and does not need to be changed however owner maintenance follow up is inadequate.  Riverton staff is recommending personnel dedicated to managing annual reporting and education to conform to the permit. 



5.4: Stormwater Easement
Year Executed: 2003
Reference Regulation:
4.2.5.3, 4.2.5.5, 4.2.5.5.3, 4.2.5.7, 4.2.5.7.1, 4.2.5.7.2
Target Pollutants:
Trash, debris, nutrients, pesticides & herbicides, bacteria & viruses, automotive petrochemicals, detergents, cleaning agents and sediment. Other pollutants common with small private communities.
Audience:
Developers, Engineers, Architects, Planners and City Staff
Description:
Stormwater easement requires description of flood and water quality control system and legal means for preservation and restoration.   
Rational:
Stormwater easements are necessary to support Program 5.3. Long-Term Stormwater Management Plan.  Methods for facilitating legal right  describing, preserving and restoring flood and water quality control infrastructure is vital for adequate protection of water  resources.
Measure of Success:
Successful long term preservation is the measure of success.  The water quality success will be measured by other programs.
Responsible Staff:
Stormwater Manager
Funding:
Stormwater Utility
Program Documents:
Stormwater Easement Template
Stormwater Easement Template Private
Conclusion:
2020-2021
Multiple easements where used this year and proved as a valuable tool for managing development flood and water quality control infrastructure.  

 



5.5: Public Infrastructure Retrofit Plan
Year Executed: 2010
Reference Regulation:
4.2.5.3.3
Target Pollutants:
Trash, debris, nutrients, and sediment. 
Audience:
Riverton Public Works Department, and Engineering & Stormwater Division staff
Description:
City projects are evaluated for water quality impacts for the purpose to bring new project to current design standards which includes LID approaches or infrastructure improve containment of urban pollution.   
Rational: 
Existing conventional infrastructure and non-structural BMPs are not adequate at containing pollutants.  It is expected additional water quality infrastructure will be necessary for satisfying  the future Jordan River  TMDL.   In addition, excess pollution mostly sediments and debris are filling the canals and creek increasing the need for dredging and concerns of residents who have ownership of land in the Butterfield Creek systems. 
Measure of Success:
Evaluate the success and failure of retrofit projects. 
Responsible Staff:
Stormwater Manager, Public Works Director
Funding:
General fund, Stormwater Utility
Standard Operations Procedures:
Stormwater Design Standards and Regulations
Capital Facility Plan:
Capital Facility Plan(CFP) includes Impact and infrastructure deficiency based capital projects.  The water quality related deficiency are marked by the CFP description. 
Appendix:
Conclusion:
2018-2019
The program is functioning but all City Departments are not aware of this program.  More training and all City Department's and Division's support in necessary.  The Public Works Department and Stormwater Division are implementing this program and have built two projects this report period, see Retrofit Log.

5.6: Private Property Retrofit Plan
Year Executed: 2019
Reference Regulation:
4.2.5.5.1, 4.2.5.5.3, 4.2.5.7, 4.2.5.7.1, 4.2.5.7.2
Target Pollutants:
Trash, debris, nutrients, pesticides & herbicides, bacteria & viruses, automotive petrochemicals, detergents, cleaning agents and sediment.
Audience:
Developers, Engineers, Architects, Planners and City Staff
Description:
Facilitate preparing a Long-Term Stormwater Management Plan and entering into a maintenance agreement  for private properties without an adequate maintenance program or prepare and record a Stormwater System Covenant for smaller properties not warranting a Long-Term Stormwater Management Plan.  This program is initiated when properties operations or systems are found to pollute and can be enforce with or without a Notice of Violation.
Rational: 
Facilitate a mechanism for adequate maintenance to prevent polluting waterways and to bring all obligated private properties into compliance with the MS4 Permit
Measure of Success:
Maintain a record of enforcement facilitating the implementation of this program. 
Responsible Staff:
Public Works Director, Stormwater Utility Manager, Legal Office
Funding:
Stormwater Utility
 
Conclusion:
2019-2020
Three City properties were retrofited with retention and low impact development approaches.  
1.  Drywell installed at 13200 South and Lovers Lane.  This is a Stormwater inlet/drywell combo.  It is functioning well and drains to a foot of water on a regular basis but is usually not completely dry during the summber months becuase of continuous irrigation overspray sources.
2.
 
 


5.7: New Development LID Incentive
Year Executed: 2011
Reference Regulation:
4.2.5.3.2
Target Pollutants:
Trash, debris, nutrients, pesticides & herbicides, bacteria & viruses, automotive petrochemicals, detergents, cleaning agents and sediment.
Audience:
Developers, Engineers, Architects, Planners and City Staff
Description:
Riverton City offers a Stormwater Utility Fee discount to development who reduce polluted discharges and runoff volumes. 
Rational: 
The program encourages operators to incorporate LID in excess of the City minimums.  Reducing runoff will trap more pollutants than would normally runoff and increase infiltration and evaporation improving water quality to rivers, streams, creeks and canals.
Measure of Success:
Maintain a inventory of qualifying properties and make performance conclusions regarding the Operators LTSWMP inspection reports. 
Responsible Staff:
Public Works Director, Stormwater Utility Manager
Funding:
Stormwater Utility
Program Documents:
Conclusion:
2011-2018
Two new development Operators have implemented LID that warrant a fee reduction but the majority of development have chosen not to take advantage of the program.  



5.8: Existing Development LID Incentive
Year Executed: 2011
Reference Regulation:
4.2.5.3.2
Target Pollutants:
Trash, debris, nutrients, pesticides & herbicides, bacteria & viruses, automotive petrochemicals, detergents, cleaning agents and sediment.
Audience:
Commercial, HOA's, Institutional and Industrial Property Owners
Description:
Application process for an Operator to apply for a fee reduction by implementing implement LID infrastructure.
Rational: 
The program provides financial incentive encouraging operators to incorporate LID over and above the minimums.  LID generally reduces runoff trapping more pollutants than would normally runoff and increase infiltration and evaporation.
Measure of Success:
Maintain a inventory of qualifying properties and make performance conclusions regarding the Operators LTSWMP inspection reports.
Responsible Staff:
Public Works Director, Stormwater Manager
Funding:
Stormwater Utility
Program Documents:
Conclusion:
2011-2018
Three existing Operators have applied for a fee reduction but neither have met the requirements.  A handful of Operators have applied for corrections and received fee corrections.



 5.9: Stormwater Utility Fee Abatement
Year Executed: 2011
Reference Regulation:
none
Audience:
Riverton single family home residents
Description:
Application and process for the reduction or elimination of the Stormwater Utility Fee.
Rational: 
Residential owners are allowed to apply for an Stormwater Utility Fee abatement when hardship can be demonstrated.
Measure of Success:
NA
Responsible Staff:
Public Works Director, Stormwater Manager
Funding:
Stormwater Utility
Conclusion:
2011-2018
No residents have applied for a stormwater fee abatement.
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